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and sergei together based on their education at a higher level to create google in private industry, if you want to declare the garage as private industry. to me sitting here google is sort of the epitome of the way all those forces come together to create what i think of innovation now, and that is what larry page said when you first apply to google, one of the things you have to learn rightway is his line is, he wants you to have all the people at googling a healthy disregard for the impossible. and that is something particularly after coming out of government, i really took me a while to shift my brain to work that way. let me answer the question in two ways in terms of innovation and i do want to bring it back to what president faust was talking about. what concerns me so greatly when i am allowed to stand on the precipice of a company that is constantly creating and innovating because of this healthy disregard they have for the impossible, like google, when i'm working with entrepreneurs and venture capitalists who also invest in that notion of no guarantees, but a sterling ride, in wo
not subtraction. we did a very bad job with outreach with people of color, we alienated college educated women, the gay vote and the hispanic vote. if the republicans are serious about growing as a party and about moving forward not only for 2014 but the presidential election, we need to grow and expand our base and we didn't do it this time. >> when the election was in process, why were you not standing up and condemning publicly some of the things that were repeatedly being said that were mildly racist, deliberately sexist, often divisive of people. why didn't you stand up and -- >> quite to the contrary. i have been very, very difficulty ebt db. >> you have been on the show regularly -- >> i have been on other networks and shows. >> we're not interested in those. >> of course not. >> sorry. >> but i've been very consistent about saying the republicans have done a terrible job about african-american outreach. it's just disgraceful. haven't done it. i have consistently gone on the sar and said when are we going to realize and say folks of people are going to want to vote for president obama f
york and across the country. is the attitude about urban education and how many kids we are losing their are not graduating from schools. basically saying, we have an issue here we have to deal with. i try to discuss that with other mayors across the state and with the decision makers. we have to come up with solutions. it is a burden for a lot of cities, not just school taxes but property taxes and trying to balance the budget to provide the services needed. this are two major problems. this is a very old city. we have a lot of beautiful historic buildings. and in many ways when people do not take care of them, it is hard to keep them on the tax rolls or make sure people invest in them. basically, i have been through five governors in my 19 years as the mayor. i deal directly with the governors and the people in the senate and the assembly. we talk about the state capital which was tax -- 74% tax exempt. a lot of it was a result of the state taking over a large percentage of our city. a lot of it was non for profits. i have had a good working relationship with people in the state
of an outstanding democrat on the subcommittee on work force protection of the education and labor committee and that is congresswoman lynn woolsey. congresswoman woolsey knows their struggles. four decades ago she was a single working mother supporting three children. she knows about the economic security of families. later as a resource manager she knew things like working families are still fighting for like paid leave, paid sick leave, retirement and health care. serving as chair and ranking member of the work force protection subcommittee, lynn woolsey was instrumental in helping to get the lilly ledbetter fair pay act signed into law and military families dealing with military deployment and injury. lynn woolsey was a partner to ensure coal miners are kept safe and healthy on the job. she went underground in a coal mine with our late colleague donald payne to require firsthand knowledge of how the workplace works and the environment in which those miners go to work every day. in the classroom, lynn woolsey continues to fight for women and working families. she was -- i want to say hars
. >> is our education system outdated? >> no. >> our union advocacy, is that outdated, how they go about fighting for it? i don't know. that question was put on the table. whether factories are shut, that means jobs have left. if you look at wages enjoyed by workers in right-to-work states, i think it should be put on the table. where do they fare? i have not done the analysis so it's hard to say. >> it's a question, though, willie, whether you want the job or not. >> right. >> i asked bob riley, i've said this 1,000 times, it seems extraordinarily important if you're a union member in the northeast, and like me, you want your factories running again. i asked bob riley, i don't understand, why did mercedes go to tuscaloosa county, alabama, instead of filling up the factories in connecticut? 15 minutes away from yale. or in rhode island. 20 minutes away from brown. i mean, right by some of the most highly trained, brilliant minds in the world. that's easy. the work force rules are so insane there, there's no way that mercedes or bmw or airbus would ever dream of going to those states. do
is in the budget issue. they think you can balance the budget by cutting. i have seen a lot of educational initiatives go on, but they do not necessarily seem to have any legs. how do we get the american public to understand the debate we had here today? it was a lot more agreement than debate. >> alison and i participated in a fiscal wake up tour. a fiscal solutions tour. now we are doing the next generation of that. we did in september and october of this year. what you have to do is build a burning platform. you have to understand the kinds of polls most politicians listen to our superficial and grossly misleading. when the public is asked, do you want to work longer for social security? do you want to pay higher premiums for medicare? do you want to pay more taxes? what do you expect them to say? my point is, when you build a burning platform case, which can be done in 10 minutes, and i have done it thousands of times, they get it. that is when you get 97% off to be the top priority, 92% agree on the principles, 85% weighted towards the spending, so what does that mean? the biggest def
get an ivy league education for free. but first this is "today" on nbc. >>> we're back at 8:46. what if you could take courses from prestigious universities like princeton, stanford, duke and others for free? well, you can. jamie gangel is in washington to explain how. good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. truly a revelation in education. some of the elite universities are offering these classes, let's say it again, for free. and they are attracting millions of students, include iing a cou who might surprise you. from finance to calculus to poetry. >> let's go to a second passage. >> reporter: world class professors are now offering their courses absolutely free. want to discover your inner passion for emily dickinson? >> her work is done in the realm of possibility. >> reporter: all you need is a computer and internet access. classes are known as massive open online courses or mooc. offered by several start-up companies, the largest and fastest growing is called coursera, the brainchild of these two professors. their goal is to revolutionize education. >> giving us the opp
know this better than i do, whether it's immigration, education, voter suppression, what the leadership of the party has done is say on immigration, you know, you got -- we want deportation. when it talks about education, it's talking about not funding it anymore. when they talk about voter suppression, they deny people the right to vote in a civil manner -- >> but you grew up in this party. it has been a party tough on immigration before, hasn't it? hasn't it been a party on a number of the issues you mentioned before? before recently. when is the big -- when do you think the republican party in your terms broke bad? when did it start to be a party you couldn't be comfortably a member of anymore as governor or as a political person at all? >> i think it started several years ago, maybe three, two, three years ago. i left the party two years ago and became an independent. and i did so because of the fact that, you know, on all of those issues it just wasn't comfortable for me to be there anymore. i mean, you know, everybody has the right to be a member of whatever party they want and i
, education, voter suppression, what the leadership has done is, say on immigration, we want deportation. when it talks about education, it's talking about not funding it anymore. when they talk about voter suppression, they deny people the right to vote -- >> but you grew up in this party. it has been a party tough on immigration before, hasn't it? hasn't it been a tough party on a number of issues you've mentioned before? >> there's no question about that. >> when do you think the republican parties broke bad? when did it start to be a part that you couldn't be a member of anymore? >> i think it started several years ago. maybe two, three years ago. i mean, i left the party two years ago and became an ind pen dependent. i did so, because of the fact that on all of those issues, it just wasn't comfortable for me to be there anymore. but, you know, for me, as a live and let live kind of guy, as somebody who wants to be toll rant, who wants to be kind, the leadership doesn't seem to embrace that kind of view. so it became uncomfortable to me. the values that my mother and father raised me and m
' including closing the educational achievement gap. the lofty goals may have to wait as lawmakers and the president toppled a number of issues that cannot wait. let's go back to the inauguration from generic 20, 2009, a few hundred feet from where we are at as he addressed the nation. he will do so again january next year. this is what he said nearly four years ago. [video clip] >> we must dust ourselves off and begin the work of remaking america. [applause] everywhere we look, there is work to be done. the state of our economy calls for action bold and swift. we will react to lay a new foundation for growth. electrical grids that bind us together. we will restore science to its rightful place and raise health care quality and lower cost. we will harness the sun and the wind to run our factories and will transform our schools and colleges to meet the demands of a new age. all of this we can do. all of this we will do. there are some who question the scale of our ambitions to suggest our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what t
talk about education, they defund it. talk about voter suppression, they deny voting to people, and i just can't embrace that anymore and be true to myself. >> let me read some of your own quotes back to you. hard to be more conservative than i am on the issues. back on 2009. pro life, pro gun, pro family, i'm anti tax. have you changed on those four specific things? >> no, i'm not saying that at all. i'm pro life, but i don't believe in imposing my will on other people. i believe people should support and protect the second amendment. i believe raising taxes isn't something anybody wants to do. certainly i never wanted to do it as a legislator or as governor. i believe in public safety. i believe in protecting the environment. i live in florida, the most beautiful state in the country in my humble opinion. these things i have always believed in. education, ethics, the environment, protecting the economy, and fighting for people. >> let's focus on taxes for a moment. in the fiscal cliff debate, tax is a big part of that. where do you stand on that if you are anti tax? >> anti tax, but
product coming up? >> i think education is coming up. there is too much regulation and areas we can't touch with unions and bureaucracy. especially college education. college education going online will be big in the next five years. >> do you have investments in that? >> the have an investment in the guy who did the google car doing online education, a stanford professor and decided online education is next and google didn't want to do it and we're backing him and it will be fun to see. >> marc andreessen, thank you for being here. send it back to the studios. >> this is embarrassing. she is like throwing herself at the camera. i've never seen this side of you. >> there's so few voices willing to say what he said out loud. >> andrew, we asked him to guest host. he can talk the disrupter stuff and politics. >> he's the ultimate disrupter. >> another guy came out. will you do that? >> marc? >> we will have him come out. he's on his way back. >> becky will be back by then so you don't have to worry about me. >> right. exactly. got it. >> she'll leave the ring. >> need some muscle to k
is education, and how to make higher education cheaper. how to reform programs. what would be the number one thing that you would do that you can do as a freshman minority senator? >> well, i don't think there's a number one thing, but a number of number one things, and we have to do them all. as a 21st century student, doesn't look like it. it's not just an 18-year-old that graduated high school. that still continues to be a significant part of the folks that are going into college, but it's also the 38-year-old who decided to go back to school to get a degree. that was my sister's experience. it's also the 25-year-old after ten years after being out of high school is stuck in service jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves with new skills. the great news is that technology advances are going to not only lower the time and cost of getting that kind of skill acquisition, but will make it, you know, much more accessible, and with we have to ensure our student aid programs are not in the way of it. right now, we have a student aid program, the pelle grants or the loan programs, they
versus virginia. employment discrimination, 13 years after brown versus board of education. the supreme court had a marriage case on its bokt in 1956. but kicked it. because it didn't want to touch it with a ten-foot pole so waited for more states to come around. it's also the year that guess who's coming to dinner comes out. there's a cultural legal convergence. we're at that moment for the gay community now. one of the historians in the gay marriage trial, nancy kauts, a historian of marriage, she said one of the emancipated slaves after -- the slaves flocked to get married. she testified that one of the emancipated slaves said the marriage covenant is a foundation of all of our rights. so i totally agree with rea that this is just the beginning but it is an important cornerstone to building full equality for lgbt citizens. >> this question of sort of how enslaved people thought about marriage, the extent to which they engaged in formal marriages and then the extent to which ones given the freedom it became one of the first things that free people did to represent their freedom is ins
for religious sisters but it now educates a diverse group of students from around the world offering high quality educational opportunities that continue to reflect its catholic heritage. soon after its founding, laroche experienced financial difficulties that threatened the school's existence. due to the financial strain, the congregation at that time seriously considered permanently closing the college, however, because of the profound and positive impact this school has made on the community in such a short time, its donors at that time, the students, the state official, the community leaders urged the congregation and the school's leadership to continue the mission of the school and keep the school opened. thankfully due to the outpouring of support from the community, in 1970 the board amended its charter to establish laroche college as an independent co-educational catholic institution which it remains today. it also joined with the art institute of pittsburgh and diversified its course official, expanding the areas of study the college would offer, including graphic and interior de
. workers have a right to expect liberal wages, health care, education care, the right to vote protected, and educate their children. these rights are reasonable and should be enforced. >> reverend jackson, you and i have known each other a long time. did you ever think you would be in michigan leading a protest against right to work? >> i really did not. i think that the tea party has 150-year-old roots between what is -- the right it organize, collective bargaining and states rights. i never thought it would go this far north, and, yet, these workers in this state must fight back and draw a line in the sand. that's why i'm going to address a major one-day strike, maybe a one-day march on washington for massive and action to bring about the ship in the flow of the wind. >> reverend jesse jackson, bob king from the united autoworkers. thank you very much. i know it's a cold day. thanks for joining us from michigan. >> thank you. >>> and let's make a deal. can president obama and the speaker get it done? we'll ask our experts coming up next. plus, the latest intelligence on syria's chemic
spending of our government, things like defense, homeland security, education, it's so-called entitlements. you've got to kurt althe increase in spending on things like medicare that's putting us in the hole. >> what you don't want to do you don't want the make it punitive for people to make charitable donations. to me that's another lose argument for the republican. you got to be very careful where you encourage the cutting of entitlements. >> yeah. one thing i don't think i should ask a democrat to do is turn medicare into a voucher program. you know, the paul ryan budget had a premium support system, which i think makes sense, but a lot of people on the left are not going to go there, but i think we could adjust the age of eligibility for medicare from 65 to 67 over the next 30 years. cue ask all three of us to pay the full cost of part b premiums. >> prescription drugs. >> the prescription drug benefit. make us pay the full costs. we can afford it. but here's what i would say, how this movie ends -- and that's your question. >> yes. >> we will wind up losing on probably the rate issue
a year. see how i did that? alabama education, i don't need no chart. >> you had a bunch of pretenders come out and they were copies of rush limbaugh. they were idiots. a guy like bill hewitt does. some other people. >> interesting. >> what's so interesting? what i'm saying. >> americans are living longer with fewer deaths from heart disease and cancer and more chronic illnesses and obesity is a problem and they're living longer sick sneer i was in the middle of a conversation. she does not care. i was hijacked. >> this is about winning. for too long, i think there are people more focused on making lots of money than they have about electing conservatives. >> yes. >> local markets are glutted with wannabes. >> it all started, limbaugh was like the guy that broke the ground and everybody said, oh, i want to be like him, whether they believed it or not. >> joe, you can't object to a free market economy. >> i don't object. >> getting paid what they're worth. >> i have no problem with some jackal out there that doesn't believe or doesn't understand about friedman or a thing about true cons
here, because we are that beacon of hope. we have the best patent laws, the best education system, especially in higher education, and we have the best opportunity for economic growth. let's take advantage of that and focus on the positive side of what we need to grow instead of teetering on the edge of the negativity that draws us apart. host: carole in annapolis, maryland, a democrat. caller: hi. i live in connecticut 20 years. guest: god bless you. caller: i loved it, but recently moved to maryland. there are two oaths of office. i'm an active member of three and took a pledge of allegiance to the united states of america. every child in this country takes a pledge of allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands and so on. every congressman and congresswoman that takes a pledge, something like i asked solemnly swear or affirm that i will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies and so on. then i will have allegiance to the same that i take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation
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want to make friends. my job is not just to entertain, but i'm trying to teach you, to educate. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. do we pay too much attention to apple? do we pay too much attention to the fiscal cliff at the expense of everything else? averages once again around the flat line with the dow up 15 points, nasdaq rising .530%. we talk about how the transports fare well, or how i like the new honeywell application. where you should buy the aig over the dip. it's fun for us to puzzle over the strength of hewlett packard. deckers down $3 because of the warm weather impact on uggs. is that what's behind coach today? that's what i regard as productive use of my time. but unfortunately, that's not the case for many of you and in many ways, it's not what you need to hear. in fact all those issues i just mentioned aren't even mildly important compared to the big stories we battle every day. first let's tackle the fiscal cliff. i'm beginning to hear a ton of blowback about how we talk about it way too much. jim, give it a rest, will you? i'm getting feedbck how our rise above campaign i
was involved in. >> absolutely. >> even dealing with kids and health and education and all the things. what really inspired her? what drove her? >> it is a remarkable -- 100 organizations. they say countless thousands of individuals that she helped along the way either through those groups or individually dispensing advice, money, you know, helping people out. the work she did with the hospitals was huge. the children's hospital in melbourne, a research center as well. i think it gives the answer to your question was she said when she was 99 she said looking out for people is the most important thing in life and is the most rewarding. happiness, i think, lies in thought for other people and trying to help them. i mean, whenever you think of rupert murdock or whatever else, this was a lovely lady. >> what does she think of her son's endeavors in the media and all the controversy around the empire? >> she was proud of all her kids. i actually knew rupert murdock's daughter, elizabeth, who was named after dame elizabeth too, and she used to speak fondly of her grandmother. this was 20 years ag
, he is -- he's a real leader. he's really smart. he's very well educated, has a graduate degree. he was raised all over the world because his parents were both in the military, both of them. and he has these core values. he was elected captain by his teammates as a rookie quarterback early on because he's signified this. i mean, this is a guy who helped put six points on the board after fumbling, a rare fumble, if you saw that play on monday night. >> yeah. >> sort of a weird play. we were all screaming, you know, that was a fumble! because obviously, if it hadn't been, it wouldn't have been six points. mike, he is really a very special character. this is not just spin. >> sam stein, i realize you went to school in the woods up there in dartmouth, but the idea of living in a metropolitan area, washington, d.c., where nearly everyone is obsessed with a single individual, the quarterback of the washington redskins, is incredible. >> andrea says this is not spin, but she's literally spinning. it's unbelievable, she's so happy with this guy. he fumbles correctly, this man walks on water
in training and educating our workers and advanced manufacturing and also providing the revenue that we need to still provide health care to our seniors and social security to those who depend on it. >> sir, let's talk about getting to the sensible center here. because as the politico poll that i referenced earlier off the top of the show indicates, 59% oppose significant cuts to defense but 75% favor across the board spending cuts. so where are you and other colleagues willing to start with those spending cuts? i mean, what are democrats willing to put on the table specifically? >> well, first of all, i've spoken to many republicans in the house. i'm one of the most liberal democratic members of the house, but i have great relationships with the republicans. all of us want to resolve this crisis. we want to come to an agreement. so i believe that we will find a way to negotiate this. we also look at, in addition to cutting in areas of pentagon spending such as maintaining nuclear weapons, we have more than enough nuclear weapons to blow up this world many times over again, we can eliminate
security is in union states, less spending on k through 12 education, less spending on infrastructure. why? because workers make less, less tax revenue coming in. right to work is bad for americans. >> why do people like the koch brothers oppose unionization, mr. hagerstom. >> unions will stont to thrive and to go forward. this gives individuals the right to determine what happens to their hard-earned money. you do not have to give your hard-earned money to a private organization to keep your job. it's that simple. it's that sirm. this is going to move michigan forward. it's going to move our state forward, allow us to compete for great paying jobs. we believe the uaw, they're going to have to be competitive, they're going to have to earn the dues from those union members and from the people on the line, and it they earn them and they're competitive, they will stay in the union and they will keep their membership. so i think they're up to the task. i think they're up to being xet at this just like everyone else in our society and we look forward to them being more responsive to workers. >>
the rules so we get more education to work permanently and it'll be more effective. nothing about welfare without work requirement. >> yeah. i think it was a couple republican governors. this was a minor thing they wanted waivers from the administration. the administration said they might be willing to give them if they came up with good plans. and the ad -- what was so misleading about the ad was the implication that obama had this plan. the implication was obama had this plan that would undo the welfare from the '90s. they might give waivers to a good plan in the states presented. but there was no sweeping plan. so there was a grain of truth to it but the basic overall message was wildly misleading. >> let's face it, made the president look like he was in favor of the people who are welfare cheats basically. i want to give them something free, right? >> of course that would be a great position for him to >> also separated from clinton, which was smart, i guess. the one that got a lot of mileage out there was mitt romney's assertion that president obama had gone on an apology tour overse
to education. we've got to work hard every day to make certain that it's good quality and that it's affordable. i think it is fair for us to compare ourselves to other nations. we are talking primarily about the western industrialized nations where their delivery systems are much less expensive to deliver care and whereby the measures of things like infant mortality, obesity, other factors, they have better outcomes than we do. whatever it is you are delivering as a service, education or health care, we should always try to examine are we doing it the right way and can we do it better. even if we say we don't want universal health care, if somebody gets sick, most of the time they end up in the hospital and they will get care. the cost of that care has simply shifted onto everyone else who is paying insurance. if you have health care at work, $1,100 of your premium goes to paying for uncompensated care, for people that short at the emergency room without coverage. host: on twitter -- guest: she's right in a way, because it's not a cliff. this is the design of speaker boehner and other republic
that's very unfortunate because if you think about it, too often the educational system is all about the adults. what we've tried to really focus in here in michigan and leading message i've been sharing is let's get focused on the kids. the kids should come first. we need to be focused on student growth. so to see schools shutting down because of an issue like this is not appropriate, in my view. those kids need a great education and it shouldn't be about adult issues. it should be about issues focused on children. >> steve: great point. you got a busy day. we thank you for dropping by and telling us what's going on in michigan. thank you, sir. >> thank you. >> gretchen: coming up on our show, i'm going to let you say this. >> eric: coming up on -- >> steve: coming up on this show, remember that funny guy in "16 candles"? >> what's happening, hot stuff? >> steve: now that guy is teaming up with billy crystal for some parental guidance. he joins us live next. >> gretchen: first, let's check in with martha mccal lull for what's coming up at the top of the hour. good morning, martha. >
55 billion come from nondefense programs, like health care, education, housing assistance. our chief political analyst gloria borger has been looking at all of these numbers. the dire consequences of going over the cliff, is it enough to force a deal? >> no. and that's what is sort of striking about it. when you talk to some liberal democrat, they actually say, you know what, maybe it's better to go off the cliff because you get the defense spending cuts that dana was talking about and the tax cuts for the wealthy expire. you can always restore the tax cuts for the middle class. she talked to some republicans, they say a bad deal is not what we want. they don't want any deal. and then, of course, you talk to the american public as we keep doing here. and the american public, take a look at this, they believe that if there is no deal, it would have a negative impact on their financial situation. i think the real problem here, wolf, is that every politician understands that they are going to get criticized if there is a deal. so what's going on right now is that they are positioning th
'm worried about you as the father of this -- >> educate me. >> -- tv show. >> yeah. >> you cannot say anything about the damn job numbers anymore. >> why? >> if you say oh, it's down to 2.1%, that's kind of good. they go ah! because it doesn't matter what you say. those jobs numbers, one side or the other, is going to absolutely freak out. now, silly me, i think 7.7% is better than 9.5%. i understand not as many people involved in trying to find jobs. more people -- i understand that. but it's a big old stew. and you take it all together and go, 7.7%. but you said pretty good jobs numbers on friday. you can't say that anymore with people on both sides knocking your head off. >> well, i mean, if you look at them since over the past four years how they are, they're back to below when the president took office, which does help. it is good news. it's better than worse. all i'm saying is if they don't reach a real, some economists believe it will impact the jobs situation and those numbers. at this point i don't think both sides can afford that, can they? >> i think what you need, whenever
and they try to take these guys through classes and give them all the heads up they can and educate them. in many instances it is just not enough. part of the problem here, bill is that these guys perform incredible athletic feats. so they feel indestructible and what they do on the field allows them to have that field because none of us could ever do any of this. they get out there and take the risks and they perform. well, that doesn't translate off the field because they're very vulnerable in a car or real life just like the rest of us. bill: the second monday morning in a row we're talking about a tragedy in the nfl. i saw a report that suggests 75% of nfl players own a gun and a few of them, seven reportedly turned their guns in over the past week. what do you know about that, jim? >> well the statistics are high. there have been players who have been followed. there are players who become targets because they have this money and they don't want to feel as though they can not protect themselves. so there probably is a much higher rate in the national football league. again i don't k
museum of naval education in pensacola florida. we have an a and t recovery manager who helps recover the planes. and an admiral. why did you want to see this one on the surface. >> this is an airplane that represents the greatest generation in world war 2 roam. these young men and women who flew the aircraft, and maintained the airplanes the wildcat was our front-line fighter at the beginning of world war ii. to bring an aircraft like this back into existence for all americans and people from around the world to see is critically important to our mission of presenting and preserving the history of naval aviation. jon: these things were pretty rugged when they were built but it's pretty hard to bring them to the surface half what, 6 5:00 years without them breaking to piece. how did you do that? >> well, i want to say it's really difficult, but we've been doing it for years and we've done it a number of times. we do it just very slowly and very carefully. >> towing it as i understand it you had to tow this thing underwater slower than a person walks. >> yeah, well, it was about 45 mil
an immigration policy around education, public safety, on business climate to welcome immigrants, welcome small businesses and help them thrive and we're also setting up this year a one stop shop for small businesses so the city of chicago, city hall is not the problem. they're part of the solution and partner to our small businesses so they're up and running, getting people employed, getting economic growth in our neighborhoods and as our neighborhoods are strong economically, our city will be strong and that's why i'm proud to have the hispanic chamber of commerce recognize the city of chicago is putting the right priorities in its own self-interest having a good immigration policy, welcoming immigrant policy and welcoming small business. those two go hand in hand. >> i think, soledad, if i might add, i think if you look at the values of the hispanic business community, they're core american values, contribution, dedication, hard work, personal accountability, that's what the hispanic business community is built upon. there are few individuals in this nation that understand that better than m
. whether it was immigration or education, or voter suppression that we saw recently. each and every one of these issues really was counter to my values, that my mother and father raised me on. >> crist's switch wasn't a great surprise. he endorsed president obama and spoke at the democratic convention as well. >>> the most famous portrait ever, ever, in history. and now a crew is digging for the most famous remains in history. >> and ben wedeman is on the trail with them. >> reporter: the story has perplexed people for centuries. the mona lisa by da vinci. in the frigid bowels of what was once a convent in florence, there is a project to find and identify the remains of a woman that posed for da vinci more than 500 years ago. historical documents seem to indicate this is the place where lisa giardini, otherwise known as mona lisa was buried. beyond that, it's all a mystery. the remains of five females have been found here. the skull may have been of lisa the second wife of a wealthy florence silk merchant. remains will be compared with the dna of two relatives buried elsewhere. no other
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